Aldi Sundried Tomato and Basil Gluten Free Bread Mix

This week Aldi offers again 2 gluten free bread mixes to bake yeast free bread loaf. One is Rosemary, Thyme and garlic bread mix, which I have reviewed in my earlier post, and the other one – Sundried Tomato and Basil bread mix, which I baked some time ago, but decided to publish the review when both products become available in the shop. These gluten free bread mixes are not on the permanent gluten free products list in Aldi supermarket and are usually sold 2 or 4 times a year. Both products are easy to bake into a soft loaf with a nice crust. They are excellent as sandwich bread and are perfect to make French toast. Featured image shows Rosemary, Thyme and Garlic bread, images below are of Sundried Tomato and Basil bread.

My oven bakes unevenly. Forgetting  to turn the loaf pan during baking sometimes produces funny bread loaf shapes. Presented bread loaf is an extreme example of this phenomenon.

Ingredients:

listed from the box I have purchased a year ago

Wholemeal rice flour,  Maltodextrin, Tapioca Starch, Raising Agents (341, 500), Dextrose,  Tomato and Basil Mix (2%) ((contains dried basil 20%, Sundried tomato 15%, Tomatoes 99,7%, preservative 223)), Iodised salt, Thickeners (415, 464), Vegetable Emulsifiers (471, 475), Acidity regulator (575), Psyllium Husk, Seasoning ((Contains natural Chicken Flavour), Anticaking Agent 551)).

 Made in Australia from imported and local ingredients.

Preparation:

Sundried tomato and basil bread was very easy to prepare according to direct and clear instructions on the box. It was very similar to that of Rosemary, Thyme and Garlic bread. Only 2 ingredients were necessary to add to the mix: water and vegetable oil. My choice in these cases is grapeseed oil. Measuring ingredients and doing everything according to the instruction on the box gives perfectly baked loaf of bread. There were no problems or difficulties in mixing, using hand-held mixer. The dough had risen very nicely during baking which took exactly 50 min in my case.

To improve nutritional value of this bread I added 10g of finely ground flax seeds. It did not change the process of bread preparation or the texture of the bread loaf.

Both types of loaves had practically identical texture, either with the addition of flax seeds or without them.

You can use butter or any vegetable oil to grease the loaf tin. I also like to use sesame seeds, white or black, or both, to sprinkle the top of the loaf. Let the loaf rest after baking until it completely cooled down and only after that do the slicing. Warm bread, as nearly all gluten free breads, can be still slightly moist inside. After cooling down, freezing and defrosting, soft texture of this bread becomes more resilient.

Out of these two varieties, sundried tomato and basil bread is my favourite. The textures of both breads are the same, but the taste of sundried variety appeals to me more. With only A$3.49 a box, this gluten free bread mix is a winner, if you like soft and fluffy type of bread, and do not mind plenty of starches in ingredients list. This type of loaf bread is not my choice for everyday consumption, but I still buy these mixes and bake this bread, as it makes amazing French toast and perfect traditional shape sandwiches.

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2 thoughts on “Aldi Sundried Tomato and Basil Gluten Free Bread Mix

  1. I love these mixes and have stocked my pantry 🙂 they work great in a bread maker and I can add extra cheese and garlic for delicious pull a parts ❤

    Ashlee.

    1. Thank you Ashlee, it’s great to know what people think of easy to bake bread mixes. I am going to buy some tomorrow.

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